The Region of The Cotswolds
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The Cotswolds

The Region of The Cotswolds

The CotswoldsThe Cotswolds are a region that is sometimes referred to as ‘the heart of England’ and it is a combination of spectacular natural beauty and picturesque villages.

The Cotswolds are a lovely place, known as the largest and possibly the best of Britain’s official ‘areas of outstanding natural beauty’.

The location of this region is in the hills of West-Central England, covering an area of about 790 square miles. The area is dominantly in Gloucestershire whilst also spreading in to Warwickshire, Oxfordshire, Worcestershire, Wiltshire, and Somerset. It is very easy to get to The Cotswolds by bus, train, or car from London as a result of its geographical location. When considering the scope of the area, one can possibly be lost in the world of charming villages of stone cottages, and beautiful green rolling pasturage.

The region of the Cotswolds
is very rich in historic references such as, the Chedworth Roman Villa, which is the largest ancient villa that Great Britain boasts. The excavated ruins include several mosaics, a shrine, over a mile of walls, and two bathhouses. These historic references indicate every aspects of the Middle Age era, from Broughton Castle and Berkeley Castle, through religious areas like Malmesbury Abbey and Hailes, to the Great Coxwell Barn. All of these are some of the interesting and historic places in the region of the Cotswolds. There is also the Blenheim Palace which has been the home to all of the Duke’s of Marlborough, the seventh of which was Winston Churchill’s Grandfather. Churchill himself was actually born in Blenheim Palace.

There are other attractions apart from the great halls and castles in the Cotswolds such as the attractive small villages. There is Bibury which is considered as the archetype of the Cotswolds village. The place is small; the homes are built with stones and slate shingle roofs. There is also Arlington Row, which is a village street that runs alongside the local river. The region of the Cotswolds is also well known for its farm produce: when looking for farmers’ markets, artisan foods, old inns, the region is obviously a great place to visit. There are places where visitors can relax with locally produced beer and original ale made in the Wychwood Brewery. As the name, ‘wolds’ implies, the region is surrounded by hills. There are three main established paths through the region of Cotswold. These are the Cotswold Way which takes about seven days to walk, The Gloucestershire Way, which is about hundred miles, and of course, the Shakespeare Way.

And of course, Wedding Video Solutions are based in the heart of the Cotswolds.

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